Phd Workshop ‘Knowing the Anthropocene’: Exploring knowledge practices of the Anthropocene

Phd Workshop ‘Knowing the Anthropocene’: Exploring knowledge practices of the Anthropocene

 

The International Centre of Ethics in the Science at the University of Tübingen is organising an international PhD workshop on the Anthropocene this summer from the 26th till the 28th of July.

The workshop ‘Knowing the Anthropocene’ explores different perceptions, measurements and understandings of the Anthropocene. It encourages participating PhD candidates to engage with each other’s ways of knowing the Anthropocene and thereby reflect on their own methods and epistemologies.

Aim of the workshop
Conceptual and empirical aspects of thinking the Anthropocene have in an important way remained divided, their dialectic interplay left unexplored. The workshop approaches this gap

Logics of the Anthropocene – Why debates about the ratification of geological epochs are more than disciplinary endeavours

Logics of the Anthropocene – Why debates about the ratification of geological epochs are more than disciplinary endeavours

In the year 2000, Nobel Laureate Paul Crutzen and biologists Eugene Stoermer popularized the term Anthropocene in order to highlight that the human influence on the Earth system is unsustainable.[i] The term indeed carries the epochal message that humans have assumed the ability to change their environment beyond the temporal and spatial scales previously considered possible.  While the insight that climate change or the loss of biodiversity are issues of global significance is not new, the Anthropocene affords a change in perspective regarding these issues. For, viewing them through the prism of the Anthropocene highlights that humans do not merely

2016 EWIS Konferenz – International Politics in the Anthropocene

2016 EWIS Konferenz – International Politics in the Anthropocene

Letzte Woche fand in Tübingen der dritte „European Workshop in International Studies“ statt, bei dem in fast zwanzig Workshops heutige Themen der internationalen Beziehungen aus praktischer und theoretischer Perspektive diskutiert wurden. Während das Themenspektrum die Breite der internationalen Politik widerspiegelte, zog ein Workshop ganz besonders das Interesse unserer Forschungsgruppe auf sich. Unter der Überschrift „International Politics in the Anthropocene“ kamen siebzehn Forscher_Innen aus Europa und Nordamerika zusammen um die verschiedenen Diskurse zum Anthropozän zu reflektieren und ihre Anwendbarkeit in den Internationalen Beziehungen zu prüfen. Obwohl die Frage nach einer neuen, in der Idee des Anthropozän begründeten Geopolitik im Vordergrund stand,

Water, water, every where – Reflections on water ethics

What is water ethics? What are the topics of water ethics? What does water ethics do? These are key questions of some of my talks and papers of the last six months.

I asked what water ethics as application-oriented ethics might be and what it can achieve critically (by reviewing the existing explicit and implicit normativities within water governance and sciences) and constructively (by suggesting how e.g. fair access and allocation of water might look like). I also explored the limits of water ethics as an academic activity. When does ethics become paternalist and post-democratic? When should it become socially

Recently published: Bossert (2015) – Wildtierethik

The Group is proud to announce a new publication in our book series Ethics of Sustainability Research. The work of Leonie is considering ethical questions in regard to wild animals and therefore opens a new and interesting field of research in modern animal ethics.

Leonie Bossert: Wildtierethik (“wildlife ethics”) (2015) (link)

blurb:
The contemporary animal ethics has primarily emerged as a reaction to human dealing with so-called livestock animals. In the following certain questions were neglected: What role can the moral considerability of nonhuman animals in general play for dealing with wildlife? Should the dealing with wild animals necessarily be the same as

A new ‘Ecomodernist Manifesto’ does not benefit the discourse of sustainable development in the Anthropocene

A new ‘Ecomodernist Manifesto’ does not benefit the discourse of sustainable development in the Anthropocene

A new manifesto has just been published which is likely to fuel debates about the Good vs. the Bad Anthropocene. The ‘Ecomodernist manifesto’ is supported by a variety of academics, many of which are associated with the Breakthrough Institute and have written in favour of an understanding of the Anthropocene as an opportunity for human development. With the manifesto, they seeks to change the conversation about sustainability towards a more openly eco-modernist discourse. Particularly, the authors advocate a stance that regards economic development as a precondition of environmental protection. The measures they thus propose include agricultural intensification, urbanisation and re-wilding

Anthropocene Campus at HKW Berlin

Anthropocene Campus at HKW Berlin

The idea that humans are the driving force in today’s Earth system, leaving a distinct layer of rock in the Earth’s crust, is the essence of the Anthropocene hypothesis. While the material history of such a development remains contested not just within the stratigraphic community that concerns itself with the definition of a universal geological timescale, it is without doubt that the intellectual history of the Anthropocene is advancing at an accelerating pace. One manifestation of this is the increasing interest of established research and cultural institutions in the development of the Anthropocene as a concept. One of the largest