After 400ppm

After 400ppm

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It is great to see that academics are increasingly deliberating jointly how to engage critically and innovatively with the anthropocene. Past examples of this are conferences at the University of Bristol and at Science Po in Paris (see my commentary here) as well as forthcoming events such as the Anthropocene Curriculum and the Anthropocene cabinet of curiosities. While no single one of these can grasp the extensive claims underpinning the anthropocene, cumulatively they are able to evaluate the different ‘golden spikes’ of this grand narrative and also suggest suitable counter-narratives. A

Thinking the Anthropocence

Thinking the Anthropocence

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The conference ‘Thinking the Anthropocene’ that took place in Paris on the 14th and 15th of November 2013 was ‘designed to begin the rethinking of the social sciences and humanities demanded by the arrival of the new geological epoch, the “Age of Humans”’. It was based on the idea that the rise of the Anthropocene as a concept is shifting the Enlightenment foundations of the social sciences and humanities, namely its conception of the natural world. Inherent in such a shift, so the organisers, is a rethinking of such central tenets